Spectacles

Lenses

Single vision lenses

These are commonly used by younger patients, but for some older patients they can be used for long range focus (e.g. driving or TV), or for close focus (e.g. reading, sewing), or for other tasks (e.g. for computer use).  Many older patients who wear bifocal or varifocal lenses also like to have some single vision spectacles too (e.g. for hill-walking, reading, sewing, computer, etc.). 

Bifocal lenses

These spectacles are available in many different versions and provide two separate focal powers within each lens.  In most cases the longer focus section is positioned towards the top and the shorter range focus is positioned at the bottom, but this can be reversed if required.  There are many situations when a bifocal lens works well (e.g. reading a newspaper and then glancing up to watch TV).  Depending on the lens type a thin line is sometimes visible.

Progressive (Varifocal) lenses

These are now becoming more popular than bifocal lenses, partly because there is no line on the lens and partly because they have more than two powers of lens for the patient to use.  There are many different types of varifocal design, and these cover many different types of usage. For some people the range of focus might only stretch from their close focus reading position to their computer screen.  For others the focus might stretch right out to the far distance (e.g. road signs).  

All lens types can benefit from a range of surface treatments such as scratch-resistant coatings, anti-reflection coatings and tints.
In addition, there are specific types of lens which offer other particular benefits including: impact-resistant lenses (for sport or work-related activities), polarised lenses (for sunglasses), and lenses that adjust automatically to sunlight and lower light conditions (photochromic lenses).

Frames

We offer a wide range of spectacle frames to suit styles and budgets. These include comfortable, ultra-light frames, and designers brands.